Training Drill: LEGO Communications

legoToday, our shift took part in a Communications drill at headquarters that was a little different from other drills that I have had.

The goal was simple: Communication. As we all know communication is a key element on the fire ground, and accurate, precise, descriptions are often key in letting other crews know the details of the task at hand.

For this drill, Engine crew’s were divided into 3 groups:

  1. Command
  2. Logistics
  3. Operations.

Equipment needed:

  • Portable Radio for each crew
  • A box of 300 LEGO’s
  • Sheets of paper

Time: 2 Hours (depending on complexity of structure to be built)

In preparation for the drill, a structure was assembled using some of the LEGOS (and hidden until the drill started). It was then placed on a piece of white computer paper labeled sides A, B, C, and D.

The three crews were separated into 3 different rooms.

Command relayed the description of the LEGO's needed to construct the structure.

Command relayed the description of the LEGO’s needed to construct the structure.

Command could only communicate with Operations, and Logistics could only communicate with Operations. Operations communicated with Command to receive the orders, and also communicated with Logistics to order the supplies needed (LEGOs).

One other piece of information was that Operations were only able to order 6 LEGO’s at once.

Operations received the descriptions and worked to build the exact same structure.

Operations received the descriptions and worked to build the exact same structure.

During our drill, we found that the different shapes, sizes, and colors of the LEGO pieces caused confusion amongst the crews. Command was relaying the information the best they could to the Operations crew, who would then have to order from Logistics. Some LEGO pieces were slanted, curved, different shades of the same color, etc. It was a great simple drill that took around 2 hours to complete, which this time can be cut down depending on the complexity of the structure the crews will have to build.

It should be noted that it was suggested to the crews to not pick up the structure to eliminate confusion on sides A, B, C, and D.

In the end, there were a few small differences between the original structure and the one the crews assembled.

The end result...not too bad :)

The end result…not too bad šŸ™‚